The Moodie Davitt Roarport

The Moodie Davitt Report is providing exclusive daily coverage of Wild Tiger’s Roar Trip, one of travel retail’s boldest CSR initiatives, via our special line extension, The Moodie Davitt Roarport.

Via phone and social media, we’ll be with Gautom Menon and Paul George Vedanayagam on every stretch of their epic 65-day road trip from Kerala to Cannes and be there to greet them on the French Riviera when they arrive on the eve of the TFWA World Exhibition. We are unlikely to be alone.

Duty free retailers: If you’d like to meet Gautom and Paul along the way (see their destination course below) let us know at Martin@MoodieDavittReport.com.

LAOS.

From India, to Myanmar, then into Thailand. And now Laos.

The Roar Crew has raced into Laos, described thus by Lonely Planet: “A land of the lotus eaters amid the bloated development of its neighbours, Laos brings together the best of Southeast Asia in one bite-sized destination.”

In the Roar Trip’s case, that’s a tiger-sized bite of course. Laos is considered one of the world’s most ethnically diverse countries, reflecting as Lonely Planet notes, its geographic location as a crossroads of Asia.

In fact, so evocative is the publication’s description that we will quote it more fulsomely: Laos retains many of the traditions that have disappeared in a frenzy of development elsewhere in the region. It’s hard to believe somnolent Vientiane is an Asian capital, and there’s a timeless quality to rural life, where stilt houses and paddy fields look like they are straight out of a movie set.

Magical Luang Prabang bears witness to hundreds of saffron-robed monks gliding through the streets every morning in a call to alms, one of the region’s iconic images. Intrepid travellers will discover a country untainted by mass tourism and Asia in slow motion – this is Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), or ‘please don’t rush’ as the locals like to joke.

With its dark and brooding jungle, glowing emerald rice fields, and the glistening tea leaves that blanket the mountains, the landscape in Laos changes shades of green like a chameleon. But it’s not just the luscious landscapes that are green: when it comes to ecotourism, Laos is leading the way in Southeast Asia. Protected areas predominate in remote areas of the country, and community-based trekking combines these spectacular natural attractions with the chance to experience the ‘real Laos’ with a village homestay.

Enough from Lonely Planet. For, alas, the Wild Tiger team do have to rush. After all, they have to be in Cannes on the eve of the TFWA World Exhibition, now just weeks away. How did our intrepid and far from lonely Roar Trip co-pilots Gautom Menon and Paul George Vedanayagam view the country?

Answer: They loved every minute of it. And while admiring the magnificent countryside, the tiger tandem team took time out to celebrate (and promote) the duty free industry, stopping off at two land border duty free stores. The first was LS & Prestige Duty Free, owned by Oriental GT Managing Director Anthony D’Souza; the second a China Duty Free Group store at Mohan Port, a small border town situated at the south end of Yunnan province on the China/Laos border.

Source:Yunnanexploration.com

A Laotian petrol pump attendant stops to read The Moodie Davitt Report. As you do…

No that’s not a tiger gasket just blown but steam from the rock pool behind the Triger (Tata Hexa)

Ready to roar with the LS & Prestige Duty Free team

Given their rapid expansion of recent years, it was no surprise that the Wild Tiger team encountered a China Duty Free Group store as they prepared to enter China. And what a roaring welcome they received from the brilliant local staff.

Where next for the Wild Tiger Roar Trip? Look out for the forthcoming episode of The Moodie Davitt Roarport as Gautom and Paul George cover 9,500kms inside China and race towards Kunming. Gautom and The Moodie Davitt Roarport have now switched seamlessly into WeChat mode, befitting China’s favourite social media platform, so that the story, and the journey, can continue.

Note: If you would like to donate directly to the Roar Trip Wild Tiger Foundation cause, the bank details are below. All funds will be remitted to the Wild Tiger Foundation.

Account Name: Roar Trip WTF

Account No: 6766903189

Bank Name: Indian Bank

Branch: Sivananda Colony Branch, Coimbatore – 641 012,

Tamil Nadu, India

IFS Code : IDIB000S075 /SWIFT: IDIBINBBCBE

All roads lead to Bangkok: With India and Myanmar behind them, the Wild Tiger team head into Thailand

A bootiful cause: The Moodie Davitt Report is one of several sponsors supporting the extraordinary Wild Tiger initiative

Paul George (left) and Gautom (sporting unbreakable Bravo sunglass aviators) chat with Indian Ambassador Her Excellency Suchitra Durai in Bangkok

Time for a rumtastic catchup with travel retail industry friend and associate, Lukas Coates, who is Purchasing Manager Liquor, Tobacco and Watches for Prestige Supplies, Wild Tiger’s local representative

And on to a fanstastic welcome at King Power International

Adding Wild Tiger colour and stripes: Gautom and Paul George meet with King Power Vice President Merchandising (Liquor, Tobacco & Confectionery) Witraporn Limbasuta and (on the right) Manager Merchandising Department (Liquor) Sira Rangsikanbhum

A fantasic panoramic view of Bangkok from the Lebua at State Tower. Is that just the effect of too many Wild Tiger rums or is the city bathed in tiger colours?

##RoarTrip, #Roarforourtigers, #KeralatoCannes, #WildTigerFoundation #TigerConservation

HOW TO SUPPORT THE WILD TIGER ROARTRIP

Via the official website  www.roartrip.in

Or:

Account Name: Roar Trip WTF

Account No: 6766903189

Bank Name: Indian Bank

Branch: Sivananda Colony Branch, Coimbatore – 641 012,

Tamil Nadu, India

IFS Code : IDIB000S075 /SWIFT: IDIBINBBCBE

Please encourage your colleagues, friends and family to consider doing so.

En route to Cannes, the daring duo will be meeting up with other travel retailers. Those wishing to ‘meet and greet’ them are encouraged to make contact. Yes, Gautom will be checking his email: gautom@wildtiger.in

EARLIER ON THE WILD TIGER ROARTRIP…

The Moodie Davitt ‘Roarport’ Days 13-15: Turning on the (King) Power in Bangkok

The Moodie Davitt ‘Roarport’ Day 12: Crossing the Indo-Myanmar Friendship Bridge

The Moodie Davitt ‘Roarport’ Days 9-11: “For their tomorrow, we gave our today”

The Moodie Davitt ‘Roarport’ Days 7 & 8: The Tigers Who Came to Tea

The Moodie Davitt ‘Roarport’ Days 5 & 6: Wild Tigers become Bengal Tigers

The Moodie Davitt ‘Roarport’ Days 4 & 5: The team earn their stripes but not a tiger in sight

The Moodie Davitt ‘Roarport’ Day 3: High times in Hyderabad

The Moodie Davitt ‘Roarport’ Day 2: Wild Tiger roars into Dufry Bengaluru

The Moodie Davitt ‘Roarport’ Day 1: 65-day tiger conservation brand odyssey waved off in ‘spec-cat-ular’ style

#RoarTrip, #Roarforourtigers, #KeralatoCannes, #WildTigerFoundation #TigerConservation

ABOUT WILD TIGER RUM: Kerala-based Wild Tiger is India’s first rum to be produced from a blend of molasses and cane spirit. The rum’s velvet tiger print stripe packaging reflects the fact that no two tigers share the same stripe pattern – so the stripe design of the sleeve has been designed and cut to ensure that no two bottles are alike.Wild Tiger made its Indian travel retail debut in February 2016 and is now available in 53 countries.

ABOUT WILD TIGER FOUNDATION (WTF): Wild Tiger Foundation is a CSR initiative by Wild Tiger Rum, which contributes 10% of its profits to the cause. It is a registered non-profit organisation headquartered in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India that focuses on the conservation of the tiger and its habitat by raising funds and creating awareness. It was founded in 2015 by drinks entrepreneur Gautom Menon and Coimbatore-based businessman Suprej Venkat.

The primary focus is the conservation of tigers and their habitats within the state of Kerala, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu, specifically Parambikulam Tiger Reserve in Kerala and Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve in Tamil Nadu. Wild Tiger Foundation acts as an influencer and an enabler.India had around 100,000 tigers in the mid-19th century. Today it has around 2,200, underlining the urgency of the conservation cause.