UK. Beauty brand Almora Botanica is targeting a new generation of eco-conscious consumers, fusing the principles of Ayurveda (a holistic form of healing) with science.

The company takes its inspiration from biodiversity and medicinal plant extracts, using rare herbs, roots and adaptogenic plants, with ethical sourcing practices.

It has launched two ranges with 14 products, called Prevent and Preserve (ages 30 to 45) and Restore and Repair (ages 45+).

The art of healing: Almora Botanica takes its philosophy from Ayurveda

Almora Botanica Co-Founder and Executive Chairman Ravi Prasad former Executive Chairman of Himalaya Wellness Company said he is committed to building a better world and that Almora Botanica was created for a new generation of health-conscious beauty consumers.

Prasad said: “I wanted to develop the cleanest and purest possible line of skincare products, offering the highest quality ingredients validated by modern science and by dermatologist-led clinical studies – and at the same time with active ingredients so concentrated that they can benefit well-ageing with their full potential.”

The concept of the brand is built on three pillars: Ayurveda (ayur, life and veda, science or knowledge); the science of Ayurvedic ingredients and Holism – taking care of yourself, your mind and body.

According to Prasad, Almora Botanica researchers have developed a global patent based on its Elixir Sapta, which is a blend of seven natural oils with an active delivery technology, for absorption into the skin.

The company is COSMOS-certified and uses green chemistry processes to ensure no harsh ingredients are released at any point in the development or manufacturing of its products.

COSMOS standards ensure the ingredients are free (where possible) from heavy metals, aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls, radioactivity, genetically modified organisms, mycotoxins, medicinal residues, nitrates and nitrosamines.

Its ingredients are cultivated and collected under GACP standards (Good Agricultural and Collection Practices) ensuring the optimal fertility of soil, lowest contamination and molecular marker levels, and absence of bacterial and fungal impurities.

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